Common School Issues

Employment concerns—wage payment,
leaves of absence, hiring and firing, performance

Contracts with teachers, parents and vendors

Policies and handbooks

Forms, releases and authorizations

Safety and security

Student discipline

Medication and allergy issues

Athletic issues and compliance

Relationships between parents, students and schools

Relationships with vendors, independent
contractors and volunteers

Claims by employees, students and parents

Claims and investigations by
outside organizations

Burtch-Paragraph-Separator

Typical Clientele

Day and boarding schools K-12

Preschools and Pre-K programs

Secular schools

Religious, faith-based schools

Administrators, teachers and students with
employment, enrollment and discipline issues
in colleges, universities and public schools

When Formulating a
Strategy for Schools,
It’s Important to
Consider All the Players.

When Formulating a
Strategy for Schools,
It’s Important to
Consider All the Players.

Educational expectations have never been higher, especially in schools where parents pay tuition. Complications are many, whether they concern teacher contracts, student discipline or overbearing parents.
In this case, a carefully executed strategy scored a win for the school.

Educational expectations have never been higher, especially in schools where parents pay tuition. Complications are many, whether they concern teacher contracts, student discipline or overbearing parents.

In this case, a carefully executed strategy scored a win for the school.

Situation  A school hired a teacher who did not reveal his disability until he was on campus. He came well recommended, but his performance proved inadequate. Even after the school provided an improvement plan, his work was still unacceptable. Yet how would people react if the teacher were fired mid-year? What were the school’s options?

Burtch Law Strategy  Script a conversation between the school and the teacher. Encourage him to see this job was not a good fit, so he would walk away voluntarily. Develop a contingency plan, and prepare a message to reassure parents, students and staff.

Outcome  The teacher resigned. As a result, the school incurred no legal or financial liability, and its contingency plan ensured a seamless transition.

Situation  A school hired a teacher who did not reveal his disability until he was on campus. He came well recommended, but his performance proved inadequate. Even after the school provided an improvement plan, his work was still unacceptable. Yet how would people react if the teacher were fired mid-year? What were the school’s options?

Burtch Law Strategy  Script a conversation between the school and the teacher. Encourage him to see this job was not a good fit, so he would walk away voluntarily. Develop a contingency plan, and prepare a message to reassure parents, students and staff.

Outcome  The teacher resigned. As a result, the school incurred no legal or financial liability, and its contingency plan ensured a seamless transition.

Common School Issues

Employment concerns—wage payment,
leaves of absence, hiring and firing, performance

Contracts with teachers, parents and vendors

Policies and handbooks

Forms, releases and authorizations

Safety and security

Student discipline

Medication and allergy issues

Athletic issues and compliance

Relationships between parents, students and schools

Relationships with vendors, independent
contractors and volunteers

Claims by employees, students and parents

Claims and investigations by
outside organizations

Burtch-Paragraph-Separator

Typical Clientele

Day and boarding schools K-12

Preschools and Pre-K programs

Secular schools

Religious, faith-based schools

Administrators, teachers and students with
employment, enrollment and discipline issues
in colleges, universities and public schools

 

BURTCH LAW PLLC | 1802 Bayberry Court | Suite 302 | Richmond, Virginia 23226 | Phone 804 593 4001 | Fax 804 593 4002

BURTCH LAW PLLC
Richmond, Virginia | 804 593 4001